Delgado Benched Tonight, Maybe More

New York Mets first baseman Carlos Delgado before a Mets/Devil Rays spring training game at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Image via Wikipedia

Willie Randolph said prior to tonight’s game that he’s giving Carlos Delgado some time to clear his head. He may sit out tomorrow night as well. Delgado has been killing the Mets for most of this season and last year. He just appears to be “done”. He can’t get around on inside fastballs anymore and frequently can’t get to high pitches.

I have to think that his decision came out of the meeting between Randolph, Omar Minaya, and the Wilpons yesterday. Hopefully, they’re working on a plan for a permanent solution to Delgado’s two year long lack of productivity. Scott Hatteberg, designated for assignment by the Reds today, might be a good start.

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2 thoughts on “Delgado Benched Tonight, Maybe More

  1. thebloggersbeat

    Carlos Delgado’s Effort Sums it all Up:Please allow me to paint a painful picture for all to comprehend, and then I want to read all of your responses to the distasteful image that I unfortunately witnessed. Tuesday, 5.20.2008, Mets v. Braves, bottom of the 3rd-inning, 1-out, 2-0 Bravos. I'm writing about an absolute, unprofessional, inexcusable, bush-league effort towards a ground ball hit to Delgado’s right during the bottom of the 3rd-inning. They had a runner on-base, so there was potential for an inning-ending double-play. Needless to say, the ball hit towards Delgado was far from a rocket, and produced such a lackluster effort that Delgado seemed scared about diving and getting his clean jersey dirty. I analyzed the play by seeing it on live television, in addition to instant replay’s played by the SNY Camera Crew. The absolute only player who can punch a free ticket to forgiveness, and easily get away with such lifeless efforts at first-base is Ryan Howard. Let’s face it, Ryan Howard and Gold Glove will not be used in the same sentence, yet, Phillies fans can probably care less about his glove work. Ryan Howard produces with his bat – and that’s the precise difference between Delgado and Howard. I would not have thought to write this article if Delgado was an offensive leader who we could rely on day-in and day-out. I am instead left with a continuance of my article brought about by a single play from Tuesday’s game. The Bravos ended-up scoring again and again during the inning, which left the Metropolitans down 4-0, and left Delgado with a shiny, clean-as-a-whistle jersey. The rest is history. Delgado’s effort added some grease to the pan of how I have a difficult time with professional athletes who settle for going through the motions. I understand how Delgado may not completely care for the New York fans; having said that, the athletes we look-up to and admire should at least want it badly enough for their teammates sake. Furthermore, Delgado made his value match-up well with his age – they’re both getting old. Please understand, that behind the long-time-no-see fist-pumping first-baseman, there is still a player who can drive a ball over any outfield wall – even the green monster. And that’s why I can see Delgado back in the American League as a DH. Nevertheless, as a current NY Met, Delgado and Tuesday’s defensive effort mirrored the players and coaches uncaring body language that has to change now.

  2. thebloggersbeat

    Carlos Delgado’s Effort Sums it all Up:Please allow me to paint a painful picture for all to comprehend, and then I want to read all of your responses to the distasteful image that I unfortunately witnessed. Tuesday, 5.20.2008, Mets v. Braves, bottom of the 3rd-inning, 1-out, 2-0 Bravos. I'm writing about an absolute, unprofessional, inexcusable, bush-league effort towards a ground ball hit to Delgado’s right during the bottom of the 3rd-inning. They had a runner on-base, so there was potential for an inning-ending double-play. Needless to say, the ball hit towards Delgado was far from a rocket, and produced such a lackluster effort that Delgado seemed scared about diving and getting his clean jersey dirty. I analyzed the play by seeing it on live television, in addition to instant replay’s played by the SNY Camera Crew. The absolute only player who can punch a free ticket to forgiveness, and easily get away with such lifeless efforts at first-base is Ryan Howard. Let’s face it, Ryan Howard and Gold Glove will not be used in the same sentence, yet, Phillies fans can probably care less about his glove work. Ryan Howard produces with his bat – and that’s the precise difference between Delgado and Howard. I would not have thought to write this article if Delgado was an offensive leader who we could rely on day-in and day-out. I am instead left with a continuance of my article brought about by a single play from Tuesday’s game. The Bravos ended-up scoring again and again during the inning, which left the Metropolitans down 4-0, and left Delgado with a shiny, clean-as-a-whistle jersey. The rest is history. Delgado’s effort added some grease to the pan of how I have a difficult time with professional athletes who settle for going through the motions. I understand how Delgado may not completely care for the New York fans; having said that, the athletes we look-up to and admire should at least want it badly enough for their teammates sake. Furthermore, Delgado made his value match-up well with his age – they’re both getting old. Please understand, that behind the long-time-no-see fist-pumping first-baseman, there is still a player who can drive a ball over any outfield wall – even the green monster. And that’s why I can see Delgado back in the American League as a DH. Nevertheless, as a current NY Met, Delgado and Tuesday’s defensive effort mirrored the players and coaches uncaring body language that has to change now.

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